Sewing

Eucalypt Tank

Hi again friends! I’m back with the other pattern that Megan Nielsen recently released, the Eucalypt tank!

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The Eucalypt tank might be familiar to you — it’s a pattern that’s been in Meg’s collection for a while but it’s back with a brand new size range.

I had the older version of Eucalypt in my pattern library but hadn’t gotten around to making it. Meg offered me the updated pattern when she sent me the final version of Cottesloe and I was excited to give it a try.

This is a basic tank pattern with a top length and a dress length. It features a scoop neckline in the front and back and the neckline/armscyes are finished with bias binding.

Be sure you look at the finished measurements before you decided on your size. This woven tank only has about 1/2″ ease built into the pattern at the bust. I went up a size to the 12 in the bust to give myself more room to move.

When I was digging around in my stash for fabric to use for my Eucalpyt I uncovered this floral rayon poplin. It was leftover from a project I made last year and I’d been wanting to make a peplum tank with it.

So, since I’m adding peplums to everything, I decided to go for it and add a peplum to the Eucalypt tank! I couldn’t be happier with this decision!

Since this was my first time making this pattern I made a quick muslin. I often have issues with gaping around the armscyes because of my forward shoulders. It turned out that I had gaping on the front and back of the armscye of this pattern.

I made some small darts on the flat pattern and also ended up doing a petite adjustment to shorten the shoulder straps and bring up the armscye a bit. I took 1/2″ out of the strap length and also filled in the armscye 1/8″ all the way around to get the best fit.

At 5’7.5″ tall, I’m certainly not petite. But I think proportionally to the rest of my body by shoulders are narrow and I’m shorter from shoulder to underarm/bust point. I have to make this adjustment sometimes and it helps so that half of my bra isn’t showing at the bottom of the armscye curve.

My method for choosing a length for the tank was very unscientific. I held the paper pattern up to my body, marked about where my natural waist was and then cut the pattern at that point. I even forgot to add back in seam allowance to the bottom but thankfully it hits me at good spot.

I cut my peplum 1.5x wider than the bottom of the tank pieces. I cut them 8″ long and hemmed them with the tiniest 1/4″ double fold hem.

I love the easy, breezy feeling of this cropped, peplum tank. The rayon poplin is so great to wear and I just love the floral print… which is totally upside down. I forgot this fabric was directional until after I cut my pattern. Ooops!

This was a fun, quick little project to sew. The instruction call for french seams, which is my sewing love language. I even attached the ruffle with a french seam to keep the insides nice and clean (and also to avoid having to change colors of thread on my serger!)

I love how it looks with my Morgan jean shorts and it will be very cute with the black twill shorts I’m planning to make before summer arrives. (Megan Nielsen’s Dawn jeans shorts, perhaps? I’ve made them as jeans but haven’t tried the shorts view yet.) I know this Eucalypt will be a Summertime favorite!

~Teri

p.s. The Eucalypt pattern was provided to me in exchange for this blog post. All opinions are my own.

 

 

7 thoughts on “Eucalypt Tank

    1. Thanks, Lisa! I love ruffle peplums, too. It’s such an easy way to change up a basic tank. I don’t think anyone will ever notice the upside down print. It’s pretty hard to tell it’s directional… at least that’s what I’m telling myself since I didn’t notice until it was too late.

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